YESHURUN Reuven

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  • Zinman Institute of Archaeology, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel
  • Africa, Ancient Palaeolithic, Asia, Middle Palaeolithic, Paleoenvironment, Spatial analysis, Taphonomy, Upper Palaeolithic, Zooarchaeology
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I am an archaeologist interested in the Paleolithic and Epipaleolithic periods, ancient human ecology, the evolution of hunting and early sedentism. I study the first settled societies of the Near East, with special focus on the Natufian Culture. Additionally, I use zooarchaeological methods to investigate human subsistence and ecology during the Pleistocene.

Following my PhD (Archaeology, University of Haifa, 2012) and post-doc (Program in Human Ecology and Archaeobiology, Smithsonian Institution, 2012-2014), I was appointed as a faculty member in the Department of Archaeology, the University of Haifa. I co-direct multi-annual excavation projects in two Epipaleolithic sites in Mt. Carmel, Israel: the UNESCO World Heritage Site of el-Wad Terrace (Natufian Culture) and the Geometric Kebaran camp of Neve David. Additionally, I study diverse Middle and Upper Paleolithic archaeofaunal assemblages, notably from Misliya Cave, Nesher-Ramla and Manot Cave.

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2020-09-14
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A way to break bones? The weight of intuitiveness
Delphine Vettese, Trajanka Stavrova, Antony Borel, Juan Marin, Marie-Hélène Moncel, Marta Arzarello, Camille Daujeard
10.31219/osf.io/rebwt

Recommended by Beatrice Demarchi and Reuven Yeshurun based on reviews by Terry O'Connor, Alan Outram and 1 anonymous reviewer
Breaking bones: Nature or Culture?

The nature of breaking long bones for obtaining marrow is important in Paleolithic archaeology, due to its widespread, almost universal, character. Provided that hammer-stone percussion marks can be correctly identified using experimental datasets (e.g., [1]), the anatomical location and count of the marks may be taken to reflect recurrent “cultural” traditions in the Paleolithic [2]. Were MP humans breaking bones intuitively or did they abide by a strict “protocol”, and, if the latter,...

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