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O'CONNOR Terry

  • PalaeoHub, University of York, York, United Kingdom
  • Bioarchaeology, Europe, Medieval, Paleoenvironment, Taphonomy, Zooarchaeology

Recommendations:  0

Review:  1

Educational and work
BSc Archaeology, PhD University of London Research Fellow, Dept of Biology, University of York 1981-90 Lecturer, Senior Lecturer, University of Bradford 1990-1999 Professor of Archaeological Science, University of York 1999-2015 Currently Emeritus Professor, University of York

Review:  1

14 Sep 2020
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A way to break bones? The weight of intuitiveness

Recommended by and based on reviews by Terry O'Connor, Alan Outram and 1 anonymous reviewer

Breaking bones: Nature or Culture?

The nature of breaking long bones for obtaining marrow is important in Paleolithic archaeology, due to its widespread, almost universal, character. Provided that hammer-stone percussion marks can be correctly identified using experimental datasets (e.g., [1]), the anatomical location and count of the marks may be taken to reflect recurrent “cultural” traditions in the Paleolithic [2]. Were MP humans breaking bones intuitively or did they abide by a strict “protocol”, and, if the latter, was this protocol optimized for marrow retrieval or geared towards another, less obvious goal?
The new preprint by Vettese and colleagues [3] took a novel approach to this question, by conducting an experiment which involved novice butchers, relying on nothing but their intuition, and recording the way in which they broke marrow-rich bones. Some variability was noted in the “intuitive” patterns; indeed, future studies replicating this experiment and adding more variables such as more experienced butchers and non-bovid bones are warranted. Similarities in the means by which novice butchers break bones was also observed, and especially telling is the strong effect of anatomical features in most bones, except for the femur.

This paper provides a baseline for location analyses of percussion marks. Their dataset may therefore be regarded as a null hypothesis according to which the archaeological data could be tested. If Paleolithic patterns of percussion marks differ from Vettese et al.’s [3] “intuitive” patterns, then the null hypothesis is disproved and one can argue in favor of a learned pattern. The latter can be a result of ”culture”, as Vettese et al. [3] phrase it, in the sense of nonrandom action that draws on transmitted knowledge. Such comparisons bear a great potential for understanding the degree of technological behavior in the Paleolithic by factoring out the “natural” constraints of bone breakage patterns. Vettese et al. [3: fig. 14] started this discourse by comparing their experimental dataset to some Middle and Upper Paleolithic faunas; we are confident that many other studies will follow.

Bibliography

[1]Pickering, T.R., Egeland, C.P., 2006. Experimental patterns of hammerstone percussion damage on bones: Implications for inferences of carcass processing by humans. J. Archaeol. Sci. 33, 459–469. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jas.2005.09.001

[2]Blasco, R., Rosell, J., Domínguez-Rodrigo, M., Lozano, S., Pastó, I., Riba, D., Vaquero, M., Peris, J.F., Arsuaga, J.L., de Castro, J.M.B., Carbonell, E., 2013. Learning by Heart: Cultural Patterns in the Faunal Processing Sequence during the Middle Pleistocene. PLoS One 8, e55863. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0055863

[3]Vettese, D., Stavrova, T., Borel, A., Marin, J., Moncel, M.-H., Arzarello, M., Daujeard, C. (2020) A way to break bones? The weight of intuitiveness. BioRxiv, 011320, ver. 4 peer-reviewed and recommended by PCI Archaeology. https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.03.31.011320

avatar

O'CONNOR Terry

  • PalaeoHub, University of York, York, United Kingdom
  • Bioarchaeology, Europe, Medieval, Paleoenvironment, Taphonomy, Zooarchaeology

Recommendations:  0

Review:  1

Educational and work
BSc Archaeology, PhD University of London Research Fellow, Dept of Biology, University of York 1981-90 Lecturer, Senior Lecturer, University of Bradford 1990-1999 Professor of Archaeological Science, University of York 1999-2015 Currently Emeritus Professor, University of York